The New York Times, January 7, 2021

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The Gamaleya Research Institute, part of Russia’s Ministry of Health, developed a coronavirus vaccine known as Sputnik V or Gam-Covid-Vac. Gamaleya announced in December that the vaccine had an efficacy of 91.4 percent. Russia is using it in a mass vaccination campaign, and it is now being distributed in Argentina, Belarus and other countries.

A Piece of the Coronavirus

The SARS-CoV-2 virus is studded with proteins that it uses to enter human cells. These so-called spike proteins make a tempting target for potential vaccines and treatments.

Continue reading “How Gamaleya’s Vaccine Works”

The New York Times, January 6, 2021

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With no robust system to identify genetic variations of the coronavirus, experts warn that the United States is woefully ill-equipped to track a dangerous new mutant, leaving health officials blind as they try to combat the grave threat.

The variant, which is now surging in Britain and burdening its hospitals with new cases, is rare for now in the United States. But it has the potential to explode in the next few weeks, putting new pressures on American hospitals, some of which are already near the breaking point.

Continue reading “The U.S. has no robust national program to track the new virus variant, experts warn.”

The New York Times, January 6, 2021

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With no robust system to identify genetic variations of the coronavirus, experts warn that the United States is woefully ill-equipped to track a dangerous new mutant, leaving health officials blind as they try to combat the grave threat.

The variant, which is now surging in Britain and burdening its hospitals with new cases, is rare for now in the United States. But it has the potential to explode in the next few weeks, putting new pressures on American hospitals, some of which are already near the breaking point.

Continue reading “U.S. Is Blind to Contagious New Virus Variant, Scientists Warn”

The New York Times, January 5, 2021

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Researchers are testing 64 coronavirus vaccines in clinical trials on humans. Here are explanations about how nine of the leading vaccines work.

Messenger RNA Vaccines

How the Pfizer-BioNTech Vaccine Works

The vaccine, known as Comirnaty, has been approved or authorized for emergency use in many countries, including the United States. Clinical trials showed the vaccine has an efficacy of 95 percent.

Continue reading “How Nine Covid-19 Vaccines Work”

The New York Times, January 4, 2021

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The Indian company Bharat Biotech partnered with the National Institute of Virology and the Indian Council of Medical Research to develop an inactivated coronavirus vaccine called Covaxin. India authorized the vaccine for emergency use on Jan. 3, despite a lack of published Phase 3 data showing the vaccine is safe and effective.

A Vaccine Made From Coronaviruses

Covaxin works by teaching the immune system to make antibodies against the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. The antibodies attach to viral proteins, such as the so-called spike proteins that stud its surface.

Continue reading “How Bharat Biotech’s Vaccine Works”